Texas 2036 Report
Opportunity assumes access to and affordability of basic health care. Basic health care includes emergency services.
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Policy Pillars

Infrastructure

Pillar 04
Pillar 04

Texas ensures people, goods, information, and energy can move within and across our borders.

Focus

Reliable and varied infrastructure is the backbone of the Texas economy — it includes roads, bridges, railways, mass transit systems, seaports, airports, pipelines, and data and electricity transmission networks. With our state’s population increasing nearly 40% by 2036, existing infrastructure will be sorely tested.
04-01

04-01

Texas Demographic Center, Texas Population Projections Program. Population Projections for the State of Texas in 1-year increments, 2036 value. https://demographics.texas.gov/data/TPEPP/Projections/Index.

Millions of working Texans and 1.2 trillion ton-miles of freight depend on Texas’s transportation infrastructure, its roads in particular.
04-02

04-02

Bureau of Labor Statistics, Texas Labor Force Data Employment for December 2019. https://www.bls.gov/eag/eag.tx.htm.

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04-03

04-03

Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Freight Analysis framework, 2018. Weight/Value for shipments Within, From, and To State by Mode. https://faf.ornl.gov/fafweb/FUT.aspx

Congestion of people and goods costs Texas an estimated $20.6 billion annually in wasted productivity and fuel.
04-04

04-04

Texas A&M Transportation Institute, 2019 Urban Mobility Report Base Statistics. Cost of congestion for Texas calculated by adding total congestion costs of each urban area in Texas in 2017, https://mobility.tamu.edu/umr/report/.

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04-05

04-05

American Transportation Research Institute, Cost of Congestion to the Trucking Industry: 2018 Update, Table 3: Top Ten States by Total Cost of Congestion https://truckingresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/ATRI-Cost-of-Congestion-to-the-Trucking-Industry-2018-Update-10-2018.pdf.

A diverse, multimodal transit network, including our seaports and airports, is essential for connecting Texas to economic growth and opportunity. Modern, well-maintained infrastructure also benefits public safety. Texas ranks 11th in its group of 12 Peer States for annual traffic fatality rates, with 3,639 deaths.
04-06

04-06

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Fatality Facts 2018, State by State. Deaths and Deaths per 100 million vehicle miles traveled https://www.iihs.org/topics/fatality-statistics/detail/state-by-state.

Digital infrastructure enables movement of information and access to essential opportunities and critical services. Texas ranks in the bottom half among its Peer States on fixed broadband subscriptions and access — that lack of broadband access has an estimated negative economic impact of $5.1 billion.
04-07

04-07

United States Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey, Types of Computers and Internet Subscriptions. Percentage of people with broadband, e.g., cable, fiber optic, or DSL. https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=broadband&g=0400000US4&tid=ACSST1Y2018.S2801.

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04-08
Robust, reliable energy infrastructure is needed to power the economy and supply businesses and individuals with electricity. Reliable access to electricity requires Texas to have sufficient electricity reserves at times of peak demand. Texas’s reserve margin for electricity dropped to 8.6% during the summer of 2019, and it is projected to be 10.6% for summer 2020.
04-09

04-09

Electric Reliability Council of Texas, News Release, December 5, 2019 http://www.ercot.com/news/releases/show/195806.

Well-maintained infrastructure allows Texas communities to better prepare for natural disasters and crises. Natural disasters and extreme weather events are increasing in frequency and severity. From 2012 to 2017 extreme weather events have resulted in 1,076 injuries, 362 deaths, and $105 billion in property and crop damage.
04-10

04-10

National Health Security Preparedness Index, 2019 Texas State Profile. Texas Health Security Hazards 2012-2017. https://nhspi.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/StateProfiles2019_TX.pdf.

The risks of infectious diseases and emerging hazards like cyber-incidents are also rising.
Goal and Targets for Texas 2036
Goal #13 - Mobility of Individuals: Texans can travel to their destinations effectively and efficiently
• Target: Texas reduces its cost of congestion to $922 per auto commuter and ranks in the Top 6 among Peer States for the highest use of sustainable transit modes by 2036.
• Baseline: Texas’s cost of congestion is $981 per auto commuter, and the state ranks 10th for sustainable transit modes among Peer States.
Goal #14 - Mobility of Goods: Texas enables economic growth by moving goods efficiently.
• Target: By 2036 Texas maintains its ranking as the top state among its peers for highest total goods moved.
• Baseline: Texas ranks first in total goods moved among Peer States.
Goal #15 - Transportation Safety: Texas maintains a safe transportation infrastructure,
• Target: By 2036 Texas ranks in the Top 9 among Peer States for lowest traffic fatality rates.
• Baseline: Texas ranks 11th among Peer States for the lowest traffic fatality rates with 1.29 fatalities per 100 million VMT in 2018; equal to 3,639 fatalities.
Goal #16 - Digital Connectivity: Texans can digitally participate in economic opportunities and essential services.
• Target: By 2036 all Texans have broadband access, and Texas’s broadband subscription rate ranks in the Top 6 among Peer States.
• Baseline: 93% of Texans have broadband access, and Texas ranks last among Peer States for broadband subscriptions.
Goal #17 - Energy Production: Texas maintains a sufficient, reliable, and cost-competitive energy infrastructure.
• Target: By 2036 Texas has a 13.75% reserve margin for electricity and remains in the Top 6 among Peer States for lowest electricity prices.
• Baseline: Texas has an 11% reserve margin and ranks second in electricity prices among Peer States.
Goal #18 - Crisis Readiness: Texas is ready to address the human, economic, and environmental consequences of natural disasters and hazards
• Target: Texas remains in the Top 9 among Peer States for highest emergency preparedness by 2036.
• Baseline: Texas ranks ninth among Peer States for emergency preparedness.

Context

Texas is home to an enormous, multi-system infrastructure network, including 314,000 miles of public roads, 10,539 miles of railroad track, 21 total ports, and 469,737 miles of pipelines
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04-11

Texas Department of Transportation, Texas Transportation Plan 2050, Highway Preservation http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot-info/tpp/2050/fact.sheet-highway-preservation.pdf

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04-12

04-12

Railroad Commission of Texas, Texas Pipeline System Mileage, 2019 https://www.rrc.state.tx.us/pipeline-safety/reports/texas-pipeline-system.mileage/

. For building and maintaining everything other than state-funded roads, local and private entities play a major role.
04-13

04-13

Texas Sunset Advisory Commission, Texas Department of Transportation Staff Report with Final Results (June 2017, Appendix F. https://www.sunset.texas.gov/public/uploads/files/reports/Texas%20Department%20of%20Transportation%20Staff%20Report%20with%20 Final%20Results

06-21-17%20%20.pdf More than 70% of Texas’s public roadway miles, all urban and rural mass transit systems, commercial airports, and seaports are managed by local governments.
04-14

04-14

Texas Department of Transportation, Texas Transportation Plan 2050, Highway Preservation. Share of Public Road Ownership. County, Town, Township, Municipal. http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot-info/tpp/2050/fact.sheet-highway-preservation.pdf

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04-15

04-15

Texas Sunset Advisory Commission, Texas Department of Transportation Staff Report with Final Results (June 2017, Appendix F. https://www.sunset.texas.gov/public/uploads/files/reports/Texas%20Department%20of%20Transportation%20Staff%20Report%20with%20Final%20Results

06-21-17%20%20.pdf

Railways, pipelines, broadband networks, and electricity grid infrastructure are privately owned and operated. Resiliency and hazard infrastructure is primarily funded at the federal level, but execution during hazard events is provided by state and local governments. Alignment and partnerships among these stakeholder groups will be critical for meeting Texas’s infrastructure challenges over the long term.